uPHP Language Basics

The following sections describe how to work with uPHP scripts.

When Wattmon parses a file, it looks for opening and closing tags, which are <? and ?> respectively. This tells Wattmon to start and stop interpreting the uPHP code between them. Parsing in this manner allows you to integrate script code within an HTML file as everything outside of a pair of opening and closing tags is ignored by the uPHP parser.

Some text
<?
  print(‘hello, uPHP’);
?>
Some more text

In addition, you can integrate multiple code blocks within a page, even if it is within a uPHP code block. For example if you wished to display a block of HTML based on a uPHP condition, it would go something like this:

<?
  If ($mycondition > 5) {
    ?> This will only be output if my condition > 5 <?
  } else {
    ?> This will be output if the first condition is not true. <?
  }
?>

As in C and PHP, uPHP requires instructions to be terminated with a semicolon at the end of each statement. The closing tag of a block of uPHP code automatically implies a semicolon; you do not need to have a semicolon terminating the last line of a uPHP block. The closing tag for the block will include the immediately trailing newline if one is present.

uPHP supports 'C', 'C++' and Unix shell-style (Perl style) comments. For example:

<?
  // comment 1
  $x=1;
  # comment2
  $x=2;
  print($x);
  /* comment 3 */
  $x=3;
  print($x);
?>

The “one-line” comment styles only comment to the end of the line or the current block of uPHP code, whichever comes first. This means that HTML code after // … ?> or # … ?> WILL be printed: ?> breaks out of uPHP mode and returns to HTML mode, and // or # cannot influence that.

'C' style comments end at the first */ encountered. Make sure you don't nest 'C' style comments. It is easy to make this mistake if you are trying to comment out a large block of code.

<?
/*
echo 'This is a test'; /* This comment will cause a problem */
echo 'Print this also';
*/
?>